Pioneer Ancestry

Researching the genealogy of Jacob F. Francom

John A Anderson

John A Anderson

Male 1865 - 1959  (93 years)

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  • Name John A Anderson 
    Born 16 Jul 1865  Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 9 Jun 1959  Evanston, Uinta, Wyoming Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Alt death: 9 Jun 1951 (Archibald Anderson book)
    Buried 12 Jun 1959  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • Salt Lake City Cemetery, West 11 153 1E
    Notes 
    • Taken from the Archibald Anderson book (probably written by Buena Anderson):

      John A. Anderson was the first child born to Carolina Jonsson and Archibald Adamson Anderson, July 16, 1865. He worked on the farm with his father from the time he was a small boy. John had great respect and love for his father and they enjoyed working together. As a young man John went to Salt Lake City to work on the City Reservoir on thirteenth east; this was his first work he had had from home. John and his father wanted very much to purchase a strip of land adjoining their farm in Birch Creek which valued at $70.00. The first pay that John received from his Salt Lake employment was exactly $70.00. John immediately sent his father the money he had earned, and the desired strip of land was purchased. John was always considerate of his brothers and sisters and his many friends. He and Lucinda Sanderson Anderson were married December 17, 1890, in the Manti Temple. John's sister, Janet, who married Olaf Asplund, wanted to get married the same day as Lucinda and John, but their mother had a strange notion that two of her children should not marry on the same day.

      The young couple first lived in a small house in the middle of the block north of Lucinda's mother and father's home. On this same block they later built their own red brick house. In the year 1908 they built a new house on the same spot where their neat little red brick house stood. Cleon Anderson, a nephew of Lucinda, later bought this home where they reared their fine family.

      Part of the time during Lucinda and John's early life, John spent away from home caring for his sheep, while Lucinda usually had a chore boy to help her care for the animals and work ont he place. When Clifton became older much was expected of him--the stock had to be driven two blocks for water and back each day. Tramps, as we called them, were numerous then and they followed the railroad track which ran back of the Anderson home. They often asked to sleep in the barn which was always kept full of hay. Some of these strangers gave her much concern because of danger of setting fire to the hay, even with these disturbing thoughts, Lucinda was sometimes heard to say that with someone in the barn, she felt that she and her children were not alone.

      Lucinda was the youngest girl in the large family of Henry Weeks and Rebecca Ann Sanders Sanderson, and she had not had real responsibility until her marriage. Her seven older sisters often called upon her to take care of their little ones when they were busy or ill. Lucinda gave birth to twelve children. Four of these children died in childhood.

      Sickness in the family also caused sorrow at times. With farming and sheep raising, John did much in building up the Fairview community. He served on the City Council and many other organizations. He was extremely generous with donations and helpful where and whenever help was needed. In 1921 the familyi moved to McKinnon, Wyoming, where John had purchased a ranch. John was chosen a Counselor in the McKinnon Ward Bishopric, where he served faithfully for many years. He also completed a Stake mission in Lyman and Mountain View, Wyoming. He served on the School Board and was a member of the Inter-State Irrigation and Reservoir Company. John A. was instrumental in the erection of the McKinnon Ward chapel and stayed on the job until its dedication.

      He died June 4, 1959, at the age of ninety four. Lucinda died March 9, 1961, at eighty-eight years of age. Both are buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery beside their little grandson, J. Martin.
    • http://www.mckinnonwyoming.com/links_to_the_past.htm#_Toc517464338

      John A. and Lucinda Sanderson Anderson had a successful profitable life in the small town of Fairview, Utah where they raised sheep. They had built and lived in a beautiful, five bedroom, modern brick home where Cindy raised her children with room for other family members for various lengths of time. John A. was a successful sheep man ranging his herds from Sanpete County to the West Desert. Cliff, as the oldest son, was a great help to his father spending months away from home with the herders or being Mother's right hand man when his father was with the sheep.

      When the Homestead Act of 1915 opened land opportunities John sent Cliff and his half brother, Hy, to Evanston to file on this "free" property as he needed more, better sheep range. They went to Evanston, filed from a plat in the land office and returned to Fairview without ever seeing this country. Cliff extracted a promise from his father that if he came here, he'd not move his mother out of her lovely home.

      In the summer of 1916 Cliff and Hy came out to "prove -up" on their adjoining homesteads. Cliff was chagrined to find that his land description didn't include the land his spring was on but the water was his. He spent that summer with the Charles Terry family earning the materials to build his two room cabin and getting to know the people of the area. He talked of baseball games with the boys from Burntfork and chivarees and dances he attended. He spent that winter on the West Desert with the sheep getting back to Fairview right after Christmas. When an epidemic of some kind closed the schools for a couple of weeks in February, he and his sweetheart, Roena Day, decided not to wait until summer to be married. They traveled to Manti with her mother and were married in the Manti temple Feb. 7, 1917. When school reopened, Roena went back to the classroom and Cliff went back to the desert.

      In June of that year they loaded their belongings into a wagon, hitched up a good looking team and, pulling a small buggy and leading Cliff's saddle horse, they headed for Wyoming. It took them over a week to make the trip but they were young, in love, and really planned to stay in Wyoming only long enough to gain title to their land, sell it and move on. It seems strange that they who didn't start out to stay last all their lives while some who planned to sink roots here weren't able to.

      Cliff was not pleased when his father uprooted his mother, sold his holdings and home in Fairvlew to buy the Beach Place from Joe Duncan and move the family here. He recognized the potential for the area but was well aware of the monumental difficulties to be overcome before water could be channeled to the land.

      John A. believed that the life giving water was in the mountains and could be used to irrigate their fields, when they got some. He was a small man physically but the work he could do and the dreams he could dream were prodigious.

      Both set to work with their neighbors, teams and scrapers and the Beaver Meadow Reservoir and the Interstate Canal came into existence. This was only possible because of the cooperation, dedication, determination and sweat of every man in the community. Cliff and John A. were both right. Water could be obtained and it was truly a gargantuan task.

      John A. and Cindy were 55 and 48 years old when they came to this area in 1920. They moved here with Eva, Lyle, Les, Von, Jessie and Bob. Buena, the oldest daughter, married Squires Tillotsen that year.

      Cindy had problems having twelve children and her hearing loss became more pronounced with each pregnancy. By the time they moved here she was completely deaf but was so adept at reading lips that you forgot she couldn't hear as she was able to follow most conversations with ease. Crowds were harder for her but she kept up with the whole world as it came to her door. It wasn't easy for her to come from relative affluence to a lonely waterless plain and leave four small graves in Fairvlew. Taking care of Von who had cerebral palsy and providing meals, clothes and beds for the rest of her family under primitive conditions would have had most of us bemoaning our fate, wringing our hands and quitting. But not this tiny, great lady. I didn't get to know her but a few years before her death but I truly appreciate the example she showed me of true grit and a genuine enjoyment of her family. She loved babies and children and their noise, of course, did not bother her. Her grandson, Chester, swore that she could TOO hear. When he, Von, Les, and Bob tried to tell jokes in Von's store, Grandma would come to the door and tell them that kind of talk wasn't necessary. She was always ready to feed, clothe or bed down anyone down on his luck.

      Cliff and Roena started their family soon after coming here. They had four boys; Chester, Kent, Allen, and Morris, and one girl, Beverley before they lost their second son, Kent, at 7 years at Primary Children's Hospital of heart trouble. They welcomed two more boys, Keith and Lloyd, and their tag-a-long daughter, Cherri, ten years after Lloyd.

      Roena taught school off and on for many years and, when teachers would fail to show up in the fall or be let go in the middle of the year, she was able to take over. She spoke of teaching unexpectedly when Allen was a baby and riding a horse up to Grandma's to nurse him at noon. When she wasn't teaching, she was on the school board or otherwise involved. She was instrumental in instituting hot lunches and a two-year high school so the kids needn’t leave home quite as young as they had had to do. Her music was the very air she breathed but education's for her children were as necessary as eating.

      Many were the dances attended but not to dance! She played for most of the dances with whomever else was available; Fred Stoll, Archie Lamb, the Terry children, the Heiner children. (I'm sorry, I don't know who else.) Archie Lamb talked to me once of playing with her and had only one fault to find; she HAD to have the music before her. He played by ear but she was never able to memorize music, although able to play anything put before her. She spoke of playing in the old hall at Burntfork when she and the piano would slowly work their way to the middle of the room and the men would band together to push them back against the wall. I can almost see her sliding across the floor, still playing? Her short gnarled fingers had truly mastered the ivories.

      All of their boys saw military service in World War II or the Korean conflict but returned safely to continue their educations and find jobs in their diverse fields. Chester in wild life management with the Game and Fish, Allen to design dams and water projects for the Bureau of Reclamation, Keith to design and work with airplanes at Boeing and the FFA and Morris and Lloyd to stay in the country and work with horses and ranching. Bev became a top-notch secretary and Cherri a compassionate registered nurse.

      After losing money on cattle his first year out here, John A., Hy, and Cliff went back to what they really knew - sheep. In a cattle era on traditional cattle range they prospered. The browse the old ewes found here opened some minds to the fact that sheep and cows prefer different kinds of feed and that the two could be run simultaneously. (Lloyd’s only problem with having both was that he had to go to twice as many meetings.) They took turns herding their band of sheep on land purchased or homesteaded on Phil Pico and grazing rights controlled by the BLM. Hy sold out after a few years and went back to Utah but John, his son. Lyle, Cliff and his boys provided most of their early work force.

      John built a nice two story home, which didn’t compare with the brick home in Fairview because of the lack of amenities available to them, but was great for its time and place. Unfortunately this home burned in 1941 leaving them homeless at ages 75 and 70 but grateful for their lives and the lives of their boys, Von and Les. It should have been enough to make one bitter but they persevered, moved another cabin in, added on, and went back to life as it was handed to them. (Granddaughter Kay and David Potter still live in this "new" house)

      Grandpa's potato patch and garden was a pleasure as well as a necessity. He was a fine family man always feeding the youngest child from his plate at meals. I know he taught Jamie to chew on her fingers as a baby by sticking her fingers in her mouth, into the sugar bowl, and back into her mouth. Not, perhaps, sanitary but a satisfying experience for young and old alike.

      John A. and Cindy continued to live in Coon Hollow and run their sheep with the help of their daughter, Jessie, and her husband, Crystal Youngberg, until 1959 when John died after an illness of only 10 days at age 94. Eighteen months later Cindy followed him at 88. They are buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery.

      Cliff worked hard tending sheep, irrigating, fencing and improving their lot. Roena gave piano lessons, raised a garden, sewed all her own and most of her children's clothes and kept her family clean and fed. They were both active in church and community activities. Cliff flew to Washington to help secure the RTA loan so telephone service could be expanded and improved. He was president of Union Telephone Co. for many years, was on the BLM advisory board,. County Fair Board, and both were school board members at different times. Roena was recognized statewide by receiving the 1955 Quealy Award from the state Homemaker's Organization.

      In 1946 they purchased the Heiner property. They were both close to fifty years old when they undertook this huge debt and most of their kids were gone from home. They did it! They never quit. for ten years later they bought the Ringdahl sheep outfit with their sons, Morris and Lloyd, and assumed an even bigger debt. Morris left in 1960 to work on the dam and later for Mt. Fuel. Cliff and Lloyd ran the sheep outfit successfully until 1966 when they sold it to Ray Cook and Lloyd bought his father's shares in the outfit.

      Cliff and Roena retired to Green River. Trips to Hawaii to visit Keith, a People to People tour of South America, Stockgrowers and Telephone conventions and Fair Board duties kept them both young. They retired, but not to rest. Cliff joined the Lion's Club and was on the advisory board for construction of the new County Courthouse. Roena belonged to a Homemaker's Club and Reading Club as well as their continued participation in Church activities.

      Cliff died in 1974 at the age of 80 after a long battle with cancer. Roena lost her hearing and had problems with her sight before she died in 1989 just days before her 94th birthday. They are buried in Green River Cemetery.

      We salute these four people and appreciate their hard work. We WILL remember them.
    Person ID I2134  Pioneer Ancestry
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2016 

    Father Archibald Adamson Anderson,   b. 27 Mar 1836, Mary Magdin, Lanark, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Dec 1892, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Mother Caroline Johnson,   b. 6 Jul 1830, Dorofvoknecky, Jonkoping, Sweden Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jan 1911, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Married 4 May 1864  Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F476  Group Sheet

    Family Lucinda Sanderson,   b. 19 Aug 1872, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Mar 1961, Rock Springs, Sweet Water, Wyoming Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Married 17 Dec 1890  Manti, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Ora Lucinda Anderson,   b. 17 Sep 1891, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Oct 1893, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
    +2. John Clifton Anderson,   b. 1 Mar 1894, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Sep 1974, Rocksprings, Sweetwater, Wyoming Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     3. William Calvin Anderson,   b. 14 Feb 1896, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 May 1900, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
    +4. Buena May Anderson,   b. 29 Mar 1898, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Nov 1987, Bountiful, Davis,Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     5. Eva Allowee Anderson,   b. 4 Dec 1900, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 May 1984, Gunnison, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     6. David Lyle Anderson,   b. 7 Jan 1903, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1974, Green River, Sweetwater, Wyoming Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     7. Owen Leslie Anderson,   b. 6 May 1905, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Dec 1980, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     8. Ethan Olaf Anderson,   b. 19 Apr 1907, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 May 1908, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     9. Edwin Max Anderson,   b. 26 Jan 1909, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Mar 1915, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 6 years)
     10. Jessie Matilda Anderson,   b. 17 Mar 1911, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Dec 1979, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     11. Von Archibald Anderson,   b. 22 Feb 1913, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Oct 1984, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     12. Robert Allen Anderson, Sr.,   b. 4 Jul 1915, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Apr 2003  (Age 87 years)
    Last Modified 2 Jul 2006 
    Family ID F523  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    ANDERSON, John A & kids
    ANDERSON, John A & kids
    ANDERSON, John A & Lucinda
    ANDERSON, John A & Lucinda
    Wyoming home
    ANDERSON, John A & Lucinda
    ANDERSON, John A & Lucinda
    50th Wedding Anniversary
    ANDERSON, John & Mary
    ANDERSON, John & Mary
    ANDERSON, John & Mary
    ANDERSON, John & Mary
    ANDERSON, John A, James, Janet, Mary (right to left)
    ANDERSON, John A, James, Janet, Mary (right to left)
    ANDERSON, John A & Von
    ANDERSON, John A & Von
    ANDERSON, John A: 50th Wedding photo
    ANDERSON, John A: 50th Wedding photo
    ANDERSON, John, Lucinda & Cliff
    ANDERSON, John, Lucinda & Cliff
    ANDERSON, JOHN A
    ANDERSON, JOHN A

    Headstones
    ANDERSON, JOHN A (1865-1959) & LUCINDA (1872-1961)
    ANDERSON, JOHN A (1865-1959) & LUCINDA (1872-1961)
    ANDERSON
    JOHN A / JULY 16, 1865 / JUNE 9, 1959
    LUCINDA / AUG 19, 1872 / MAR 9, 1961
    MARRIED 1890

    Histories
    ANDERSON, John & Lucinda: History
    ANDERSON, John & Lucinda: History
    Anderson, Buena. History of John A Anderson & Lucinda Sanderson. Courtesy of www.mckinnonwyoming.com.

  • Sources 
    1. [S15] Cemetery Record, Utah Cemetery Burials Database, http://history.utah.gov.
      John A Anderson, 9 Jun 1959, 12 Jun 1959, Evanston, Wyoming, Salt Lake City Cemetery, West 11 153 1E